Posts Tagged Quartodecimans

39. Passover/Abib 14 is a Festival Day!

It is abundantly clear that there is an overwhelming amount of evidence that supports the 7-day observance of Passover and Unleavened Bread being Abib 14-20. Also, it can be demonstrated that this was the practice of Yahushua the messiah and the early assemblies who later were referred to as Quartodecimans. (System A)

Nevertheless, there are many who would stubbornly disagree with this conclusion in the face of the facts and continue on with a form of the Pharisaic/Hasidic practice of an 8-day observance of eating unleavened bread from Abib 14-21. (Hasidic/Pharisaic System B and Modern-Hybrid System G)

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29. Passover – What Now?

This Passover Series so far has endeavored to lay the groundwork for a much-needed and long-overdue discussion regarding the correct method for observing the Festival of Passover and Unleavened Bread.

What has been lacking from any previous discussions, especially among the various Sacred Name groups of today, is the history of the earliest Christians and their Passover practice during the first few centuries C.E.

One of the reasons for this oversight is the fact that there are many who are not even aware that such a history exists!

To counter the ignorance of historical evidence, this Series has brought the true Passover practice of the Quartodecimans to light along with the importance that it be included as a consideration in the ongoing quest for Yahweh’s truth of the matter.

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25. Passover – Roman Corruption I

The Quartodecimans argued that Christians should observe only the 14th as the Passover supper and Eucharist mystery (cup and bread) because the messiah and his disciples kept that same day.

Nevertheless, there was strong resistance by the Roman assembly.

The Quartodeciman (System A) and Quasi-Quartodeciman (System D) practice was made more difficult to overcome by the fact that they were both based upon the same apostolic authority (the apostle John).1

It soon became obvious that if the Roman assembly was to gain political dominance in the West, as well as over many of the eastern assemblies, a new strategy was required.

In response, during the last decade of the second century C.E., the western leaders and theologians developed a new approach: the Roman assembly Passover and, after the Council of Nicaea in 325 C.E., canonized as the Roman Catholic Passover (System E).

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24. Passover – Anatolius Speaks!

Proof that the seven days of Unleavened Bread for the Quartodecimans extended from the 14th until the end of the 20th day of the first lunar month is established from records provided by their offshoots, the quasi-Quartodecimans of System D.

The most important source for their view is found in the records of Anatolius of Alexandria.

To his words we can add the statements provided by the Audians and several bishops representing assemblies located in different parts of Europe.

Anatolius of Alexandria
Like the Quartodecimans, those who kept System D observed the 14th until the end of the 20th for the seven days of Unleavened Bread.

The most famous advocate of this system was Anatolius of Alexandria (c.230-283 C.E.).1

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22. Passover – The Quartodecimans II

An important fact regarding the Quartodecimans that has been missed by most followers of Yahweh is that the Quartodecimans claimed and demonstrated authority from Yahushua the messiah and Scriptures for their practice of Passover.

Though they considered themselves not to be under the written Torah, they followed the guides of the Torah with regard to “all the festivals.”

Chrysostom (347-407 C.E.)
Chrysostom, a strong advocate of the Roman Catholic System E, for example, demonstrates this point in his work titled Adversus Judaeos, where he condemns the Quartodeciman Christians because of their practice of celebrating such scriptural high Sabbath days as the Day of Trumpets, the Day of Atonement, and the Festival of Tabernacles.1

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21. Passover – The Quartodecimans I

Of all the professed followers of Yahweh, few are aware that during the first four centuries C.E. support was very strong among the early disciples and assemblies following Yahushua the messiah for the Aristocratic system of keeping Passover and Unleavened Bread which was a 7-day Festival observed during Abib 14-20 (System A).

It may also come as a surprise to learn that this view was in fact the original practice of all the earliest orthodox Christians.

Its advocates and supporters were in later centuries referred to as the Quartodecimans (14th keepers).

In our posts dealing with the Quartodecimans we shall investigate the antiquity of the Quartodeciman practice, demonstrate that they observed the 14th day of the first moon for the Passover supper, and present their claim that they observed Passover according to both Scriptures and the examples set forth by the messiah and his apostles.

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20. Passover – Christian Factions II

An important fact to realize is that there were eight basic premises concerning Passover, the seven days of Unleavened Bread, and Pentecost which were almost universal and formed the foundation upon which the overwhelming majority of the early Christian assemblies, whatever system they followed, stood:

1. The Passover celebration was required for all Christians.1

2. The Christian Passover was an innovation in that it did not require any ritualistic animal sacrifice.2

3. The Passover lamb of the Torah and its sacrifice was a typology of the death of the messiah, the true Passover lamb of Yahweh.3

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19. Passover – Christian Factions I

The Festival of Passover and Unleavened Bread along with the Festival of Shabuath (Pentecost) were not just Jewish concerns.

Today, few English-speaking Christians, largely due to their long practice of glossing the Hebrew word Phasekh (Passover) with the name Easter and their abandonment of the Festival of Pentecost, realize that Passover and Pentecost were the chief religious observances of the early Christian assemblies.

In one form or another, all early Christian groups not only observed the Passover and Pentecost but calculated the Passover observance in connection with the seven days of Unleavened Bread.

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15. Passover – Aristocratic Practice II

There is little doubt that the ancient Samaritans reflected the Sadducean position with regard to the timing of byn ha-arabim (twilight after sunset).

To support this detail, we retain one piece of evidence from an ancient Samaritan writer, Ezekielos the Tragedian, in his work titled ἐζαγωγή (Exagoge; Deliverance).1

This work was composed sometime between the first part of the second century until about 90 B.C.E.,2 i.e., as early as the outbreak of the Hasmonaean Revolt or as late as the first decade of the next century.

Clement of Alexandria calls Ezekielos “the poet of Jewish tragedies.”3 Important fragments of the Exagoge have survived in the works of Eusebius.4

Internal evidence from this tragic drama reveals that the author belonged to the ancient Samaritan sect, which used the Aristocratic method.5 As we shall demonstrate, the ancient Samaritans held that byn ha-arabim begins the day and that the entire Festival of Passover and Unleavened Bread lasts only seven days, beginning with the 14th.

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14. Passover – Aristocratic Practice I

The Aristocratic understanding (System A) of “בין חערבים (byn ha-arabim)” was represented by the Jews called Sadducees, the Boethusian Sad­ducees, and by the ancient Samaritans.

Moreover, the Aristocratic practice was utilized by Yahushua the messiah, his apostles, and the early assemblies that followed him.1

Very few writings which discuss just how to observe Passover have come down to us directly from any acknowl­edged Sadducean, Boethusian, or ancient Samaritan source. So, for an acquaintance with their opinions, we are mainly dependent upon their antagonists.2

These antagonists, and records which are derived from the later variations of this view (as demonstrated by the neo-Samaritans and Karaites),3 show that, contrary to the Hasidic views, the Aristocratic approach understood that the first ערב (arab; intermixing of light and dark) occurred at sunset and the second at deep twilight (the setting of darkness).

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Passover: Confusionville?

What scriptural topic do you think evokes the most confusion and controversy among those professing to be followers of Yahweh?

If your answer is the Festival of Passover it is obvious that you are quite astute.

It seems that almost everyone who attempts to correctly observe the Festival of Passover is at variance with some other person or group. Logic dictates that not everyone is right and at the same time there is the possibility that everyone is wrong.

What’s the problem and how does it get fixed?

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